Posts Tagged ‘New Jersey’

THE BORINQUENEERS – Theatrical World Premiere

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

The Borinqueneers

Friday, July 13, 6PM – 9:30PM

Newark Museum
49 Washington Street
Newark, NJ.

Reception and Q&A Session with the film’s producer Ms. Noemi Figueroa Soulet

This event is a fund-raiser for the New Jersey Hispanic Research and information Center (NJHRIC) at the Newark Public Library.

The Borinqueneers chronicles the story of the all-Puerto Rican 65th Infantry Regiment, the only Hispanic segregated unit in U.S. Army history. Using rare archival footage and intimate interviews, this film explores the exploits andpainful tribulations of these now-forgotten veterans. Risking their lives to further the cause of democracy, these soldiers from the U.S. colony of Puerto Rico, were drafted but were not afforded full citizenship rights. Many served and died valiantly. During the Korean War they would face their toughest challenge,.

ADMISSION IS FREE, BUT PLEASE NOTE THAT SEATING IS VERY LIMITED AND REQUIRES PRIOR RESERVATIONS.

To RSVP call Newark Museum at call (973) 596-6550 or email arquelio.1.fraticelli@verizon.com.
For more information, including directions to Newark Museum, visit www.newarkmuseum.org.
The museum is easily accessible from New York City.
It is 3 blocks from the NJ Path Station – Broad Street Station.

We hope you will be able to join us for a well-deserved and long-overdue recognition of the Puerto Rican 65th Regiment.

Visit www.borinqueneers.com!

El Pozo Productions
P.O. Box 302
Crompond, NY 10517
(914) 739-3989
contact@borinqueneers.com
www.borinqueneers.com

TRIBUTE TO ED VEGA YUNQUE _ NOVEMBER 15, 3PM -7PM AT PRDREAM, 1355 Park Ave at 102nd St

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

vega-yunque.190.jpg

NOVEMBER 15 TRIBUTE: A non-stop, ongoing reading of Ed Vega’s “The Lamentable Journey of Omaha Bigelow into the Impenetrable Loisaida Jungle” — Magical Realism comes to Loisaida (and now El Barrio)! Bring your copy!

*****

September 9, 2008
Edgardo Vega Yunqué, Novelist of the Puerto Rican Experience in New York, Dies at 72

By BRUCE WEBER
Edgardo Vega Yunqué, whose novels and stories about life on the Lower East Side of Manhattan were picaresque, combustive and sometimes flamboyantly comic expressions of the Puerto Rican experience in New York’s multicultural maelstrom, died on Aug. 26 in Brooklyn. He was 72 and lived in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn.

The cause was probably a blood clot, said his daughter, Alyson Vega, who said that he died suddenly during a visit to the emergency room at Lutheran Medical Center and that his family had not been immediately notified.

Mr. Vega Yunqué, who moved to New York from Puerto Rico at the age of 13 and spent his teenage years in a Puerto Rican and Irish neighborhood in the Bronx, resisted characterization both as a writer and as an individual. Angered by the expectation of Latin writers either to document ghetto life or to “dabble in magic realism,” as he put it, he was known as a contentious man with a philosophy founded on the sanctity of self-expression, and he wrote with a voice that was lyrical, insistent, irrepressible and often scathingly satiric.

In “The Lamentable Journey of Omaha Bigelow Into the Impenetrable Loisada Jungle,” (Overlook Press, 2004), he cast a comic, sardonic eye on the American response to the Sept. 11 attacks. His latest book, “Rachel Horowitz, Puerto Rican Sex Freak,” an earthy send-up of sexual politics, was scheduled for publication this summer but Overlook canceled it after a dispute with him.

“He was an iconoclast of the first order,” said his agent, Tom Colchie. “Ed was always cantankerous about editing. He would say, ‘I’m not going to be any publisher’s fuzzy-wuzzy.’ ”

With a counterculture-ish perspective and a penchant for florid turns of phrase and hyper-punctuated sentences, he had a literary relative in Tom Robbins, though his work often had a political fierceness about it as well.

His best-known book, “No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It Cauze Bill Bailey Ain’t Never Coming Home Again” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2003), is a sprawling tale of two families, one Puerto Rican and one Irish, and their intertwining over several generations. The Vietnam War plays a central role and so does American jazz, not only thematically — one main character is a pianist who walks away from the chance to play with Miles Davis when he joins the Marines — but stylistically as well, with narrative strains wandering improvisatorily away from the main tale and finding intricate paths that bring them back again. Julia Livshin, writing in The New York Times Book Review, said it was a “powerhouse of a novel” that “brings vividly to life, with its polyphony of voices, the simmering ethnic stew of the great American city.”

Edgardo Alberto Vega Yunqué was born in Ponce, Puerto Rico, on May 20, 1936, but he was raised in the town of Cidra. His father, a Baptist minister, moved the family to New York in 1949 when he took over a Spanish-speaking congregation in the South Bronx. Mr. Vega Yunqué was a radio operator in the Air Force, and during one home leave, he was asked by his sister to help clean out an estate in central New York. In the attic he found hundreds of paperback novels — by Steinbeck, Faulkner, Hemingway and others — and he began reading them voraciously. That spurred him to write novels.

Mr. Vega Yunqué attended New York University and worked as a community organizer before publishing his first novel, “The Comeback,” in 1985. His other works include two collections of stories and the novel “Blood Fugues.” (HarperCollins, 2006.) In 1994, he founded the Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural Center on the Lower East Side as a home for theater artists, dancers and visual artists, and he ran it until 2000, when he stepped down, his tenure marred by fierce disputes between the mostly Hispanic theater artists and the mostly white visual artists over the center’s management.

Mr. Vega’s marriage to Pat Vega ended in divorce, the culmination of what his daughter, Alyson, and his stepdaughter, the singer Suzanne Vega, described as a tempestuous home life. Her stepfather was passionate about knowledge and passed that zeal on, Suzanne Vega said. “But the thing that made him a great writer was the thing that also made him dangerous,” she added. “Any boundary or restriction he took as a red flag.”

In addition to Suzanne and Alyson Vega, both of Manhattan, Mr. Vega Yunqué is survived by a son, Matthew, of Amagansett, New York; a brother, Jay Vega, of Cape May, N.J.; a sister, Abigail McGlynn, of Queens; and a granddaughter.

RoCa: Jersey Style

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

September 18, 2008 – February 22, 2009
Opening Reception:
Thursday, September 25th, 2008
Time: 6 – 8pm

Project Gallery
Jersey City Museum
350 Montgomery Street at the corner of Monmouth Street
Jersey City, New Jersey

http://www.jerseycitymuseum.org

PATH
From Manhattan: Take the Newark or Journal Square-bound train to the Grove Street station in Jersey City. Exit the station and walk south (the Hard Grove Café will be on your right) on Grove Street for three blocks to Montgomery Street and turn right. Walk 3 1/2 blocks to the Museums main entrance at 350 Montgomery Street.

From Newark: Take the 33rd Street or World Train Center-bound train to the Grove Street station in Jersey City. Exit the station and walk south (the Hard Grove Café will be on your right) on Grove Street for three blocks to Montgomery Street and turn right. Walk 3 1/2 blocks to the Museums main entrance at 350 Montgomery Street.

Hudson Bergen Light Rail From Hoboken: Take the 22nd Street or West Side Avenue-bound train to the Jersey Avenue Station. Walk north on Jersey Avenue (Jersey City Medical Center will be on your left) for three blocks to Montgomery Street and turn left. Walk 1 1/2 blocks to the Museums main entrance at 350 Montgomery Street.

From Bayonne & West Side Avenue: Take the Hoboken Terminal-bound train to the Jersey Avenue Station. Walk north on Jersey Avenue (Jersey City Medical Center will be on your left) for three blocks to Montgomery Street and turn left. Walk 1 1/2 blocks to the Museums main entrance at 350 Montgomery Street.

DRIVING DIRECTIONS
From Manhattan via the Holland Tunnel: exit the tunnel and continue two blocks to Manila Avenue and make a left turn. Go straight on Manila Avenue for 12 blocks and cross over Christopher Columbus Drive, at this point Manila Avenue becomes Grove Street. Continue straight on Grove Street for three blocks and make a right turn on Montgomery Street. Follow Montgomery Street 3 1/2 blocks to the museum’s main entrance.

From points north or south on the New Jersey Turnpike: Take NJ Turnpike to exit 14C. Go through the first ticket tollbooth (bear to the left over bridge). Follow TP extension for a few miles until 2nd set of pay tollbooths. After which, take your second exit, marked “Jersey City – Columbus Drive.” Follow the exit ramp and continue straight through the traffic light (crossing Montgomery Street) and bear right onto Christopher Columbus Drive. At the 3rd traffic light make a right onto Varick Street, continue to the next traffic light and make a right onto Montgomery Street. The museum is on the right, at the next light, at the corner of Monmouth and Montgomery Streets.

Three Latina Artists / Tres Artistas Latinas

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Calero Lazarus

February 2 – March 27
Panel Discussion: Wednesday March 11, 2009 2pm
Closing Reception: Sunday, March 22, 2009 3 – 5PM.

Elia Alba, Rodriguez Calero, Juana Valdes are three Latina artists whose multimedia artworks are meditations on being women artists with Spanish-speaking Caribbean heritage. “By birth or heritage their roots are in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean” writes Anreus. “Within its diversity the Spanish-speaking Caribbean shares a similar colonial history, a hybrid spirituality and a multi-racial identity. All of these issues continue to be potent in the lives and culture(s) of Latinos in the United States.” Curated by Alejandro Anreus. Catalog available.

Ben Shahn Center for the Visual Arts
Court Gallery
William Patterson University
300 Pompton Road
Wayne, New Jersey 07470
1973.720.2654
www.wpunj.edu

7th Annual NYC Brides March Against Domestic Violence, Wed 26 sep

Friday, September 21st, 2007
New York Latinas Against Domestic Violence
c/o Violence Intervention Program, Inc.
P.O. Box 1161 New York, NY 10035
(212) 410-9080
www.nylatinasagainstdv.org

For Immediate Release
September 25, 2007

Contacts:
Antonieta Gimeno (646) 672-1404, cell 917-981-1625
Janice Cruz (646) 672-1404

Seventh Annual NYC Brides’ March Against Domestic Violence
Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Scores of “Brides” and Supporters Will March Through Manhattan and the Bronx to Remember Gladys Ricart and Other Victims of Domestic Violence
For the seventh year in a row, scores of women dressed in wedding gowns, along with men dressed in black, will march through the streets of Washington Heights, the South Bronx, and East Harlem to raise awareness about the devastating effects of domestic violence on Latino and other families and communities.
Marchers will start gathering at 9 a.m. in front of the offices of the Dominican Women’s Development Center at 251 Fort Washington Avenue where they will hear from some of the march organizers. The six-mile march will begin promptly at 10:30 a.m. and will end after 3 p.m. in East Harlem at the Bonifacio Senior Center, 7 East 116th Street with a speak-out and closing ceremony (see attached march route).

The Brides’ March, also known as The Gladys Ricart and Victims of Domestic Violence Memorial Walk, is an annual event that was started in 2001 to remember Ms. Ricart, who was murdered by a former abusive boyfriend on the day she was to wed someone else, and all the other women who have been killed or injured in domestic violence incidents (see chronology of events attached). Because the wedding dress, the emblem of happiness and everlasting love, has been forever tainted in the Latino community by Gladys’ murder, it is a strong symbol for the New York Latinas Against Domestic Violence (NYLADV), the main organizers of the March.

Marchers will be joined by Josie Ashton, a Dominican woman from Florida who originated the idea for the first march, after being strongly moved by the murder, slanted media coverage, and some community members’ insensitive response to Ms. Ricart’s murder. Ms. Ashton resigned from her job and sacrificed more than two months of her life away from her family to walk in a wedding gown, down the East Coast, from New Jersey to Miami, in an attempt to draw attention to the horrors of domestic violence.

Local government officials and community figures including Manhattan Borough President Scott M. Stringer, Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion, NYS Senator Erik T.  Schneiderman, Assembly Member Adriano Espaillat, Commissioner Yolanda Jimenez from the NYC Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence, Council Members Melissa
Mark-Viverito, Robert Jackson and Miguel Martinez, will also join the marchers and speak during the day’s events.

Dozens Of Deaths And Hundreds Of Thousands Of Domestic Violence Incidents Reported Each Year In New York City.
According to the NYC Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence, there were 71 family related homicides in 2006 as of December 31, 2006. Family related homicide includes intimate partner homicide as well as homicide committed by other family members and includes children who were killed as a result of family violence. 83% of these cases had no known prior police contact and 6% of these cases had a current Order of Protection. At present, there are 2,081 domestic violence emergency shelter beds citywide, a 35% increase since January 2002.
In addition, according to the Mayor’s Office, the police responded to 221,071 domestic violence incidents in 2006; this averages to over 600 incidents per day. And teen dating relationship abuse continues to be a problem as well. The City Domestic Violence Hotline received 9,462 calls from teens in 2006.
Rosita Romero, Executive Director of the Dominican Women’s Development Center said “domestic violence is not a women’s problem; it is a problem that affects the entire family and our society as a whole. It is also connected to other types of violence in our society. We have to find better ways of relating to each other as human beings; on a more equal level and with more kindness and compassion. We need to educate ourselves more about this pandemic to make a bigger commitment to prevent it and eradicate it.”
Josie Ashton who will address the marchers during the rally at the Bonifacio Senior Center stresses that “we continue with our commitments to every woman, man and children to work hard every day to fight domestic violence. Our hope is that our government and members of our community will do the same.”
A partial list of sponsors for the 2007 NYC Annual Brides’ March include:

New York Latinas Against Domestic Violence, the Ricart family, Josie Ashton, Nuevo Amanecer, Violence Intervention Program, Dominican Women’s Development Center, The National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence, Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation, Assembly Member Adriano Espaillat, National Dominican Women’s Caucus, Anthony Diaz from Fortune Society.
A partial list of participating individuals and organizations include:

Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrión, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, State Senator Eric T. Schneiderman, Congress Member Charles B. Rangel’s Office, Seny Tavera Special Counsel to Lieutenant Governor David Patterson, Crucita Medina Martinez, Bonifacio Senior Center, NYC Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence, NYC Mayor’s Office on Immigrant Affairs, New York City Police Department, New York City Department of Sanitation, Assembly Woman Noemi Rivera, Council Member Miguel Martinez, Council Member Robert Jackson, Council Member Helen Foster, Council Member Melissa Mark-Viverito, Jorge Abreu from Heritage Health Housing, Reverend Luis Barrios from the San Romero de las Americas Church, Reverend Hector Laporte, Lucy Pizarro of Levántate Mujer, Planned Parenthood, CONNECT, In Motion.