Archive for the ‘Corrientes’ Category

PRdream mourns the passing of Herman Badillo 1929 – 2014

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

From the New York Times

Herman Badillo, America’s first Puerto Rican-born congressman and a fixture in New York City politics for four decades who championed civil rights, jobs, housing and education reforms, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. He was 85. His death, at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital, was caused by complications of congestive heart failure, his son, David, said.

Mr. Badillo rode many horses on New York’s political merry-go-round from 1962 to 2001. Besides being elected to four terms in Congress, he was a city commissioner, the Bronx borough president, a deputy under Mayor Edward I. Koch, a counsel to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, a candidate for state and city comptroller, and a trustee and then board chairman of the City University of New York. But the prize he most coveted — to be New York’s first Puerto Rican mayor — eluded him, despite six tries, in 1969, 1973, 1977, 1985, 1993 and 2001. The ’85 and ’93 bids were so short-lived, they hardly counted, and he never won a major-party endorsement, although he came close in 1973, losing to the city comptroller, Abraham D. Beame, in a Democratic primary runoff. Mr. Beame went on to be elected mayor.

The peaks of Mr. Badillo’s career were his seven years in Congress, in the 1970s, when he advocated urban renewal, antipoverty programs, voting rights and bilingual education, and his leadership of the CUNY board, from 1999 to 2001, when it ended open enrollment in the senior colleges and raised standards for admission, curriculums and graduation after years of academic decline.

He called himself “the first Puerto Rican everything,” and it was true in a way. He was a role model who overcame an impoverished orphaned boyhood and an inability to speak English to become a famous politician. He lost many elections but won respect as a fighter, as the first Puerto Rican city commissioner and borough president, and as the nation’s highest-ranking Puerto Rican officeholder.

Mr. Badillo’s political odyssey was a long arc from Kennedy-style liberalism in the 1960s to Giuliani conservatism in the 1990s. He defied party loyalties and was by turns a Reform Democrat, a Democrat, a Republican and a neoconservative. A lean, broad-shouldered man with a proud, solemn bearing, he often spoke his mind bluntly, sometimes offending ethnic sensibilities and alienating constituents. He called Mr. Koch “cowardly,” for example, and derided Mr. Beame as “a malicious little man” in a 1973 mayoral primary debate. (Mr. Badillo said he had been referring to Mr. Beame’s “pettiness of mind” and not his physical stature. Mr. Beame was 5-foot-2, Mr. Badillo 6-foot-1.)

Mr. Badillo ran for mayor six times. He challenged Michael Bloomberg for the Republican mayoral nomination in 2001. Early on, Mr. Badillo supported bilingual education and assistance for the poor. Later, he concluded that the immigrant’s path to assimilation and prosperity lay in self-reliance, not government largess; he advocated a meritocracy of standard achievement tests, opposed bilingual education and promoted urban renewal to create jobs and housing, even when it displaced poor people.

In the 1990s he became a Republican, Mr. Giuliani’s education adviser and Gov. George E. Pataki’s CUNY chairman. His last hurrah was a 2001 challenge to Michael R. Bloomberg for the Republican mayoral nomination. Even friends called it quixotic, but it reflected the trajectory of a self-made man who had often run the New York City Marathon and always thrived on adversity.

Herman Badillo (pronounced bah-DEE-yoh) was born in Caguas, P.R., on Aug. 21, 1929, the only child of Francisco and Carmen Rivera Badillo. His father, an English teacher, died when Herman was 1 and his mother, when he was 5, both of tuberculosis. Relatives took him in, and at 11 he was sent to New York. Shunted among relatives, he lived in Chicago, in California and with an aunt in East Harlem. He learned English and became an excellent student at Haaren High School in Manhattan. Working as a dishwasher, bowling pinsetter and accountant, he graduated with high honors from City College in 1951 and from Brooklyn Law School as valedictorian in 1954, then settled into law practice in New York.

He married the first of three wives, Norma Lit, in 1949, had one son, and was divorced in 1960. In 1961, he married Irma Deutsch Liebling; she had Alzheimer’s disease and died in 1996. Later that year he married Gail Roberts, who lived with him in Manhattan and East Hampton, N.Y. She and his son survive him.

Mr. Badillo founded an East Harlem Kennedy-for-President committee in 1960 and supported Mayor Robert F. Wagner Jr.’s successful antimachine campaign for re-election the next year. The mayor rewarded him, in 1962, with the new post of commissioner of housing relocation.

Mr. Badillo went on to defy Bronx Democratic bosses and win the borough presidency in 1965. He opposed the Vietnam War, backed the presidential candidacies of Robert F. Kennedy and, after Mr. Kennedy’s murder, Senator Eugene J. McCarthy, and won a seat in Congress in 1970. He was re-elected in 1972, 1974 and 1976. But while his political life would continue for 25 years, he never won another election.

He quit his safe congressional seat in 1977, a year early, to become a deputy mayor to Mr. Koch. But they had a falling-out over South Bronx redevelopment, and he departed in 1979. He lost a challenge to Mr. Koch in the 1985 Democratic mayoral primary and a 1986 race as a Democrat for state comptroller. He fared no better as a Republican. He did so poorly in a 1993 mayoral primary campaign against Mr. Giuliani that he quit and became his rival’s Republican-Liberal running mate for city comptroller. He lost again, but Mr. Giuliani won and named him an education counselor.

In his book “One Nation, One Standard: An Ex-Liberal on How Hispanics Can Succeed Just Like Other Immigrant Groups” (2006), Mr. Badillo said Hispanic Americans undervalued education, which he called tragic for the nation’s largest ethnic minority. He was appointed CUNY chairman in 1999, but resigned in 2001 to make his final run for mayor, challenging the billionaire Mr. Bloomberg in the Republican primary. Mr. Giuliani and Mr. Pataki, his erstwhile patrons, backed Mr. Bloomberg, the winner, and Mr. Badillo retired from politics.

Saturday, November 15th, 2014

Friday, November 14th, 2014

LAUNCH PARTY FOR “OUR NUYORICAN THING” by Sam Diaz — Sunday, June 29, 2:00-3:30PM

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

2Leaf Press author Samuel Diaz Carrion is having his Launch Party for his recently released book, Our Nuyorican Thing, The Birth of a Self-Made Identity on June 29th at 2:00-3:30PM at Taller Boricua in New York City.

Poet, writer and activist Diaz Carrion explores the question, “What is a Nuyorican”? and more in Our Nuyorican Thing. What started out as blog correspondence for the Nuyorican Poets Cafe’s website (2001-2004), quickly turned into a cultural exchange about the Cafe and Puerto Rican culture. Our Nuyorican Thing is a compendium of those blog entries and emails that also include poetry and short prose through the eyes of Diaz Carrion, a “Puerto Rican Indiana Jones” who has quietly studied “the trade route of a new language . . . collecting poetry and stories as the artifacts of the day.” This collection is riveting, informative and delightful, and will satisfy any reader with a cultural appetite. Our Nuyorican Thing’s introduction byPuerto Rican poet, performer, professor, and polemicist, Urayoán Noel.

Please join Samuel Diaz Carrion as he shares his prose and poetry as he enlightens us about the Nuyorican experience.. It will be a night of great poetry, good conversations, and a great way to spend a Sunday afternoon. This event will be hosted by legendary Nuyorican poet, Jesús Papoleto Meléndez. Download the diaz-book-party-flyer and pass it around!

TALLER BORICUA
1680 Lexington Avenue, NYC | 212.831.4333
www.tallerboricua.org
Directions: Subway: 6 Train to 103rd Street
Entrance on Lexington Avenue between 105th and 106th Streets
Center is accessible for individuals with disabilities

SPEAKER OF THE NYC COUNCIL ON RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO FAMILIES SUFFERING FROM THE AFTERMATH OF THE COLLAPSED BUILDINGS IN EL BARRIO

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Dear Friends,

This has been an extremely difficult week for El Barrio/East Harlem. The tragic building collapse that took place just a half block from my district office has been a painful experience for our community. I send my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those we lost and my thoughts remain with the families and friends of those who are still missing.

As I have shared in my public appearances, I was on my way down to City Hall when I received a tweet about the explosion. I turned around and went back to the district right away, establishing a command center out of the District Office.

Since Wednesday, I have been touring the scene throughout the day, monitoring all developments and keeping in close contact with all city agencies. My staff is continuing to connect individuals and families to available resources and seek options for permanent housing in our local community for those who need it.

Services for Residents

Individuals seeking assistance from city agencies can visit the Resident Service Center on Saturday and Sunday from 9 am to 5 pm. The Center is now located at 1580 Park Avenue (@ 114th Street) under the MetroNorth tracks at La Marqueta. The center at the Salvation Army on 125th Street will no longer be open. You can also call 311 or my district office (212-828-9800) with any inquiries.

The City is actively seeking opportunities for short- and long-term housing and is working around the clock to get vacated buildings back on line for families.

As I have been stressing, it is critically important that our immigrant communities in particular understand that no one should be afraid to come forward and seek assistance because they do not have legal status. City agencies are prohibited from asking about immigration status.

How You Can Help

I want to thank everyone for their expressions of support and for wanting to provide assistance during this difficult time. We are currently exploring a mechanism to accept monetary donations and make sure that these funds are used to provide services and support to our neighbors in need. I will be in touch with more information in the coming days.

In the meantime, please continue to keep our neighbors in your thoughts and prayers.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Melissa Mark-Viverito
Speaker
NYC Council

FROM THE SPEAKER OF THE NYC COUNCIL MELISSA MARK-VIVERITO CONCERNING THE BLAST THE TOPPLED TWO BUILDINGS

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Dear Friends,

This has been an extremely difficult week for El Barrio/East Harlem. The tragic building collapse that took place just a half block from my district office has been a painful experience for our community. I send my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those we lost and my thoughts remain with the families and friends of those who are still missing.

As I have shared in my public appearances, I was on my way down to City Hall when I received a tweet about the explosion. I turned around and went back to the district right away, establishing a command center out of the District Office.

Since Wednesday, I have been touring the scene throughout the day, monitoring all developments and keeping in close contact with all city agencies. My staff is continuing to connect individuals and families to available resources and seek options for permanent housing in our local community for those who need it.

Services for Residents

Individuals seeking assistance from city agencies can visit the Resident Service Center on Saturday and Sunday from 9 am to 5 pm. The Center is now located at 1580 Park Avenue (@ 114th Street) under the MetroNorth tracks at La Marqueta. The center at the Salvation Army on 125th Street will no longer be open. You can also call 311 or my district office (212-828-9800) with any inquiries.

The City is actively seeking opportunities for short- and long-term housing and is working around the clock to get vacated buildings back on line for families.

As I have been stressing, it is critically important that our immigrant communities in particular understand that no one should be afraid to come forward and seek assistance because they do not have legal status. City agencies are prohibited from asking about immigration status.

How You Can Help

I want to thank everyone for their expressions of support and for wanting to provide assistance during this difficult time. We are currently exploring a mechanism to accept monetary donations and make sure that these funds are used to provide services and support to our neighbors in need. I will be in touch with more information in the coming days.

In the meantime, please continue to keep our neighbors in your thoughts and prayers.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Melissa Mark-Viverito
Speaker
NYC Council

EL MUSEO WANTS YOU!

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

WHAT IS ART? YOU TELL US…

For its upcoming exhibition, Unconventional Origins, El Museo del Barrio is seeking objects from local homes and businesses in East Harlem as evidence that art is everywhere. If you have an object that you consider to be “art” in your home, we’d like to borrow it!

THE RULES OF PARTICIPATION:

EVERYONE COUNTS: One object per person, please, so that many people can participate.

SIZE MATTERS: In order to have room for everyone’s treasures, no 2D object may be larger than 30 x 30 inches. No 3D object may be larger than 24 x 24 x 24 inches.

GIVE IT UP: Be prepared to lend us your object from late February to early September, 2014. If you will miss it too much, consider lending something else.

WE PICK UP NOW: We will pick up your object as soon as it’s decided. Please get in touch with me directly to make arrangements at ralvarado@elmuseo.org or 212.660.7149

YOU PICK UP LATER: Works must be picked up at El Museo between 10AM and 4PM on Monday and Tuesday, September 8-9, 2014. Contact Sofia Reeser to let us know when you will be coming, sreeser@elmuseo.org.

KEEP IT REAL: Artists and collectors may not submit their own work or work from their own collections, but may submit some other object from their home or studio that they consider to be “art.”

THE CONTRACT: When you deliver, you must fill out a loan agreement that notes your adherence to these rules. El Museo will insure your objects while they are on display to a maximum of $250.

WRAP IT UP: Make sure you deliver your work properly packaged so that it is safely protected.

THINGS WE DIG: Old photographs; old documents; recuerdos; dolls; fancy dishes; religious or spiritual objects or images; family pictures; small sculptures; ceramics; accessories; small paintings; souvenirs; capias; art made with non-art materials like shells, feathers, beads; masks; drums; small pieces of furniture; anything that you’ve had for a really long time…

YOU KEEP THE GOOD STUFF: While El Museo is always grateful for donations, we will not be accepting any objects from this project for its collection, so your loaned object will remain yours!

QUESTIONS?: Call or email the curatorial department! 212.660.7169 or ralvarado@elmuseo.org

Raza con “A”: A Latina Artists Exhibit at the Gallery Space at Wagner

Sunday, November 3rd, 2013

 

 

Please join us on Tuesday, November 12, for a special panel discussion and live music reception celebrating the opening of Raza con “A”: A Latina Artists Exhibit, the Fall/Winter 2013 exhibition at the Gallery Space at Wagner.

When:
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
6:00PM-9:00PM

Where:
NYU Wagner
The Puck Building
295 Lafayette Street, 2nd Floor
Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue / Gallery Space

Jayuya Revolt of 1950 – A talk with Dr. Olga J. Wagenheim

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

The co-editor of “The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History” commemorates the 1950 uprising in Jayuya, Puerto Rico.

Wednesday, October 30, 6pm

TALLER BORICUA
at the Julia de Burgos Latino Cultural
1680 Lexington Avenue (at East 106th Street)
New York, NY 10029

We are honored to host Dr. Olga Jimenez Wagenheim who will be giving a talk on Blanca Canales. The segment she is reading is part of a recently published revised/updated edition of a book she and Kal Wagenheim compiled years ago, entitled: The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History.

Sponsored by the Center for Puerto Rican Studies and Taller Boricua.

Friday, October 18th, 2013