Posts Tagged ‘San Juan’

Halt to Puerto Rico’s Northeastern Nature Preserve

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: November 1, 2009

SAN JUAN, P.R. (AP) — Puerto Rico’s governor on Friday canceled the designation of part of the island’s northeastern coastline as a nature reserve, opening the door to large-scale development along a white-sand beach where proposals for hotel resorts have sparked bitter protests.

The order signed by the governor, Luis G. Fortuño, directs environmental authorities to evaluate 3,240 acres of public and private land and identify the most ecologically sensitive areas. Those sections would be preserved, while others could be opened to developers.

Currently, only small, eco-friendly projects are allowed in the reserve.

“There should not be any doubt that a nature reserve will be established here,” the planning board president, Hector Morales, said at a news conference.

Conservation groups have fought to keep hotel projects out of the Northeast Ecological Corridor, which includes a beach fringed with tropical forest used by endangered leatherback sea turtles as a nesting area. Proposals for resorts rallied opposition from celebrities including the actor Benicio Del Toro and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an environmental lawyer.

Mr. Fortuño’s predecessor, Gov. Aníbal Acevedo Vilá, ordered the preservation of the corridor in 2007, and his administration had begun seeking financing to buy private parcels from their owners.

But Mr. Fortuño faced pressure from officials, including the mayor of Luquillo, José González Ortiz, to open the region to development that would create jobs.

Opening Night CIRCA Puerto Rico ’06

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

CIRCA

CIRCA Puerto Rico ’06

The First International Art Fair in the Caribbean

At the Puerto Rico Convention Center San Juan

Opening Night – May 25, 2006

Roberto J. Nieves, President Anabelle Lampón, Executive Director Elvis Fuentes and Celina Nogueras Cuevas, Artistic Directors Celia Sredni de Birbragher, Paco Barragán and Fernando E. Gutiérrez, Consultants
www.circapr.com

Deadline for Exhibitor Applications: March 27, 2006

Circa Puerto Rico ’06, the first international art fair in the Caribbean, will launch on May 25 – 28, 2006, at the new Puerto Rico Convention Center in San Juan. The fair will feature some 100 exhibitors from Puerto Rico, Latin America, the United States and Europe.

Scheduled to occur shortly after arteBA, the Buenos Aires art fair, and opening on the heels of the Latin American art auctions in New York, CIRCA Puerto Rico ’06 will bring the best of Modern and contemporary art to a local and international audience of collectors. It will be the first and only art fair of its kind in the Caribbean and Central America, where an important group of collectors has emerged in the past few years, in response to the region’s burgeoning and dynamic artistic community and prominent museums and galleries.

For galleries who wish to apply, please visit www.circapr.com or contact:
CIRCA Puerto Rico
Portfolio FIAC, Inc.
Drive-In Plaza 2135 Carr. #2
PMB 455 Suite 15
Bayamon, PR 00959-5259
USA

Tel. +1 787 279 7675
Fax. +1 787 797 4502
info@circapr.com
www.circapr.com

Deadline for Applications: March 27, 2006
A committee will then gather to select a final list of exhibitors, which will be made public before April 1st.

CORT(H)ITOS AT MEDIANOCHE

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Free Screenings of the CIRCA 2006 Short Films Program

Direct from San Juan, Puerto Rico! Come see the latest in Caribbean
and Latin American short films! Curated by Carmen Oquendo-Villar

June 9 – 11
7PM – 9PM
Friday, Saturday and Sunday

At MediaNoche

161 East 106th Street, First Floor

(between Lexington and Third Avenues)

For more info: 212.828.0401

Directions: Take IRT #6 train to 103rd Street, walk North 3 blocks,
and turn right.

Galerías Prinardi presenta “Contrapunto”

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

ballester2.jpgballester.jpg
Diógenes Ballester
(Ponce, Puerto Rico, 1956)

Estudia en Ponce Puerto Rico y Madison, Wisconsin. Pintor grabador, dibujante, profesor y teórico. Domina los diferentes medios plásticos prefiriendo la encáustica en la pintura. Culturalmente, su trabajo demuestra una genuina preocupación por la historia del caribe y la diáspora de nuestros pueblos. Plásticamente presenta un lenguaje expresionista afincado en el realismo mágico.

Sincretismo Transnacional (Díptico)

La obra de Diógenes Ballester es parte de la exposición colectiva CONTRAPUNTO exbiéndose en Galerías Prinardi hasta el 10 de noviembre de 2007

Contrapunto:

¨Técnica de composición que combina diferentes líneas con coherencia armónica y formando un entramado completo.¨
¨Contraste que se produce entre dos cosas que suceden simultáneamente o que se hallan juntas.¨

Artistas participantes: Diógenes Ballester y Martín García / Rafael Tufiño y Domingo Izquierdo / Camilo Carrión y Magoo

Galerías Prinardi – Hotel Normandie
499 Muñoz Rivera, esquina Rosales
San Juan, P.R. 00901
T. 787-729-2929 x 1042 E. prinardi@prinardi.com

HONORING A LEGEND: DR. ANTONIA PANTOJA

Sunday, November 1st, 2009
Antonia Pantoja

Dr. Antonia Pantoja, Social Work ’54, a pioneer in education, social work, feminism, and civil rights. The founder of ASPIRA, the Puerto Rican Forum,
Boricua College, and Producir, Dr. Pantoja demonstrated the true value of leadership in our community: the ability to create profound change in
all that she touched with her kind hands.

Dr. Pantoja’s life, from her girlhood in San Juan, to her community organizing in New York City and San Diego, to her social and political activism (retirement) in the foothills of El Yunque, Puerto Rico. It is a wonderful work that reminds us to never forget one of our greatest heroes.

HONORING A LEGEND: DR. ANTONIA PANTOJA

Friday, November 9th, 2007

Light Dinner, Film Screening, Q&A with Film Director: 7-9:30pm

Columbia University
Broadway Room, Lerner Hall
2920 Broadway
New York City

Please RSVP to LAACUevents@gmail.com.

Admission: Students, $3; LAACU Members, $10; Non-Members, $15
* Free t-shirt for the first 25 attendees.

A portion of the proceeds will go to the Latino Educational Media Center for the completion of the documentary on Dr. Pantoja’s life.
Please support this project in honor of this legendary Latina.

Brought to you by Latino Heritage Month, the Latino/a Caucus, the Columbia Mentoring Initiative, and the Latino Alumni Association of Columbia University.

Call for Papers -Deadline for submission: 15 February 2008!

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

8th Conference – Puerto Rican Studies Association
8va Conferencia – Asociación de Estudios Puertorriqueños

October 1-4

Centro de Estudios Avanzados de Puerto Rico y el Caribe
San Juan, Puerto Rico

Program Committee
Chair: Elizabeth Crespo-Kebler (crespokebler@caribe.net)

Members:
Luis Aponte-Parés (Luis.Aponte@umb.edu)
Gladys M. Jiménez-Muñoz (gjimenez@binghamton.edu)
Anthony De Jesus (tdejesus@hunter.cuny.edu)
Myrna García Calderón (mygarcia@syr.edu)
Frederic W. Gleach (fwg1@cornell.edu)
Jorge Duany (jduany@coqui.net)
Carmen Haydeé Rivera (chrivera@coqui.net)
Carmen Milagros Concepción (cmconcepcion@uprrp.edu)
Alice Colón-Warren (colonal@coqui.net)

Rafael Tufino, 1922 – 2008

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

PRdream mourns the passing of our great painter and friend Rafael Tufino

Rafael Tufino is one of the central figures in the history of 20th Century Puerto Rican art. A versatile artist in many media, Tufino has been a major force in founding and furthering modern Puerto Rican art–both on the Island and in the Caribbean Diaspora.

Tufino’s work spanned a period of more than 65 years, depicting Puerto Rican life in urban New York, and pre-industrial Puerto Rico. While the artist’s work often celebrates popular traditions, including folk artists, religious and secular festivals, Tufino remains committed to fostering the appreciation of the Island’s African cultural contributions, especially as expressed in dance and music. Tufino’s images have become a trademark of Puerto Rico’s rich cultural heritage.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Tufino moved permanently to Puerto Rico with his Puerto Rican parents in 1936, initially studying under the Spanish painter Alejandro Sánchez Felipe and with Juan Rosado at his sign-painting workshop in San Juan. In the late 1940s he studied painting, printmaking and mural painting at the Academia de San Carlos in Mexico with José Chavez Morado, Antonio Rodríguez Luna and Castro Pacheco. He joined the staff of the Division of Community Education in Puerto Rico as a poster artist and illustrator in 1950, serving as director of the graphic arts workshop of this division from 1957 until 1963. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966 and the National Award for the Arts in 1985. He had two major retrospectives at El Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico in San Juan, Puerto Rico; and El Museo del Barrio in New York, in 2002 and 2003, respectively. PRdream has an extensive interview with the artist in its archives, interview clips may be viewed along with his work in LA GALERIA of this web site.

Puerto Rico Strikes

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

By Yolanda Rivera
From the October 30, 2009 issue | Posted in International | Email this article

A STRIKING ISLAND: More than 200,000 Puerto Ricans joined a general strike Oct. 15.

puertorico.jpg

PHOTO: SEIU INTERNATIONAL, FLICKR.COM

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO—In 1934, the year of the largest sugarcane workers’ strike in Puerto Rican history, Antonio S. Pedreira, a wealthy writer and educator, described Puerto Ricans as lazy and irresponsible: “To be lazy, in our country, is self-repression, lack of mental activity and freewill […] We are squatting before our future.”
Seventy-five years later, the attitudes of Puerto Rico’s ruling elite appear unchanged. Faced with widespread opposition to plans by Gov. Luis Fortuño to fire tens of thousands of public-sector workers and privatize government services, members of the governor’s staff have called workingclass Puerto Ricans “ticks” “garrapata” and terrorists and told them to accept privatization and layoffs because “such is life.”

Fortuño, leader of the Partido Nuevo Progresista (the equivalent of the Republican Party), was inaugurated Jan. 2, 2009. In his first 10 months in office he has fired more than 23,000 public-sector workers despite promising during his campaign that he would not make layoffs. His announcement on Sept. 25 that he was firing nearly 17,000 workers spurred labor, student, religious and community groups to organize a general strike on Oct. 15.

Fortuño’s administration reacted by stoking tensions. Top law-enforcement officials including the justice secretary and police superintendent threatened to charge strikers with terrorism if they disrupted traffic at the island’s ports. Independent observers such as the American Civil Liberties Union described the government threats as “dangerous” and “sowing fear.”

The week before the general strike, 10 campuses of the University of Puerto Rico closed their doors to prevent student protesters from using the facilities to mobilize. During democratic assemblies that gathered record numbers, students had already closed the main university campus in solidarity with fired government workers, including teachers, janitors and other service employees.

Despite the official intimidation, the demonstration and walkout went ahead Oct. 15, drawing an estimated 200,000 people and shutting down most businesses, schools and government activities on the island.

During the protest, numerous workers said the massive layoffs were part an effort to “sell the island,” — to destroying public services in order to justify privatization and provide subsidies to companies owned by associates of the governor.

One marcher carried a sign calling the governor “Fortocho,” a mix of Pinocchio and Fortuño. Another had a picture of the governor as a chicken with the question, “What came first, the chicken or the egg?” referring to an unemployed worker who threw an egg at the governor during a press conference a few weeks earlier. Others chanted: “So, where’s Fortuño? Fortuño is not here. He’s selling what is left of this country.”

Many people showed their dissatisfaction by scrawling anti-privatization messages on buildings. Others wore masks of the governor’s face while they brandished fistfuls of money. After the march, students blocked the country’s largest highway and kept it closed until the police and some conservative leaders pressured them to abandon their efforts.

With a population of 3.5 million, Puerto Rico has been a U.S. colony since 1898. About 48 percent of the population lives under the poverty level and government layoffs, which represent about 12 percent of the public sector workforce, are projected to push the unemployment rate to 17 percent.

The firings were made possible by Law 7, which passed in March. It allows Fortuño to unilaterally dismiss public-sector workers, overriding labor laws that previously prohibited such actions. Union contracts are no protection either, as Law 7 effectively voids any job protections they may contain. What’s more, Law 7 clears the way for firing more public-sector workers by allowing for “Public-Private Alliances” — a euphemism for handing over government functions to private corporations.

While the governor and pundits claim the mass layoffs are necessary because the government is “too big” and is facing a $3.2 billion budget deficit, Puerto Rico is slated to receive more than $5.7 billion in funds from the U.S. stimulus package passed earlier this year. Fortuño also claims that private companies provide better services and that public-sector workers earn too much. Previous governors used the same justification for prior rounds of privatization that ended in disaster.

Pedro Roselló, governor from 1992 to 2000, privatized health services and sold hospitals. While insurance companies fattened their profits by delaying payments and services, enabling them to earn interest on public funds, the population has seen co-pays increase and intolerable delays in basic and urgent care, as in the case of cancer patients. Moreover, government officials under Roselló reportedly stole money from an organization that provided services for AIDS patients. In 1998, Roselló also sold Telefónica de Puerto Rico, a public telephone company, an action that triggered an enormous two-day general strike.

The following governor, Sila Calderón, the first female governor in the island (2000 to 2004), outsourced billing services in the Public Water Authority to ONDEO, a French company, which failed to meet the terms of its contracts but was paid $540 million. Aníbal Acevedo Vilá, the governor from 2004 to 2008, privatized testing services in the Department of Education and signed numerous contracts for millions of dollars with charter school organizations while denying salary increases to public school teachers. The independent teachers union, Federación de Maestros, staged a successful strike and won salary increases.

Puerto Rican workers have also seen massive layoffs in the private sector as the economy has been in recession for more than four years now. The governor claims privatizing public services will create 200,000 new jobs by 2013. The government’s development plans include promoting medical tourism; privatizing much of the public energy authority; displacing poor communities to build expensive apartments and shopping malls; and a luxury resort, casino and marina on a former U.S. naval base. Few believe Fortuño’s promises, however, given the mass layoffs he claimed would never happen.

Laid-off workers have few options. Even if they manage to land a job, an abysmal rate of private-sector unionism, less than 3 percent, means few protections. Private companies will not recognize decades of service in the public sector, offer health insurance or match government salaries.

Meanwhile, despite promises of state support, fired workers wait in unemployment lines so long that people arrive the day before their appointment at the Labor Department to claim benefits; their only alternative is accepting a government offer of $2,000 to leave the island.

While a large number of Puerto Rican workers and students are resolved to fight the government’s policies, the movement is divided. The ruling elite are banking on this. Following the general strike, Fortuño’s Chief of Staff, Rodríguez-Ema, said, “I know we will prevail since the movement is divided.”

The most conservative unions and political organizations are allies of the former ruling party (Partido Popular Democrático, the equivalent of the Democrats). The conservative unions, some of which seem most concerned with not losing union dues, are affiliated with large U.S. unions, such as the SEIU. These unions are mostly organized under Law 45, instituted in 1998, which allowed for unionizing public-sector workers while taking away their right to strike. Many of these workers had previously been in more militant labor “associations.”

Conservative and moderate groups are interested in getting concessions from the government even if this means reducing working hours for all public-service workers or eliminating the government’s contribution to the workers’ health insurance. During the 1998 strike against the sale of the public telephone company, leaders in some of these unions and organizations demobilized a mass-based movement that put up to 500,000 people in the streets. They negotiated a truce with the government, and the telephone company was finally sold.

While the Oct. 15 mobilization marked a big step forward, halting and reversing privatization will require a still higher level of struggle. Independent unions, such as the university non-teaching employees union, called for a workers’ party during the march. The Federación de Maestros, the teachers’ union that held a strike under the former administration; the union of electric company workers; and political organizations such as la Organización Socialista Internacional and the Movimiento Socialista de Trabajadores called for organizing from below. These unions and political groups, together with other community organizations and university professors (Asociación Puertorriqueña de Profesores Universitarios), have supported calling a general strike in the future.

Yolanda Rivera is a member of the Organización Socialista Internacional. Lee Sustar contributed to this report.

Puerto Rico status should be clearly decided

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

MCT News Service
October 29, 2009
Puerto Ricans need to be allowed to vote on changing their political status. The status quo is untenable.

With little fanfare, a bill is circulating in the U.S. House of Representatives that proposes an election that may ultimately decide the fate of Puerto Rico. The bill is needed now more than ever, for the island is gripped in a fiscal and political crisis that can no longer be ignored.

Puerto Rico has been an incorporated territory of the United States since 1898, and its residents were granted U.S. citizenship in 1917. Although the United Nations and much of the world have recognized it as a colony, Puerto Rico’s status as a “free associated state” has resulted in a stagnant economy and mounting political unrest.

It’s been a rough month for Puerto Rico.

First, in an attempt to rectify a financial crisis, the island’s governor, Luis Fortuno, announced the layoff of 17,000 government employees, which was met with massive, angry protest. A few days later, an unemployed worker threw an egg at Fortuno during a news conference, and one of the island’s biggest rap stars insulted the governor on an MTV awards show.

Then, the island’s largest labor unions led a general strike that paralyzed the capital city of San Juan.

Two weeks ago, drug violence took the lives of eight people in a shopping mall. Puerto Rico is suffering under a wave of drug crimes, as efforts to crack down on the illicit trade along the southern border of the United States have had the effect of rerouting it through the Caribbean.

This week, the island is recovering from a massive gas explosion that has cost $6.4 million to put out and may result in long-lasting environmental damage.

The chaos in Puerto Rico is largely a function of its peculiar status.

Since becoming a territory of the United States, Puerto Ricans have wrestled with three political options: “commonwealth” (status quo), statehood, and independence. But this struggle seems to have no endgame, and the people of this island nation are the losers.

By remaining a commonwealth, Puerto Rico has failed to acquire sufficient political power and has become subservient to U.S. economic interests.

Puerto Rico needs to move to a place where its economy can develop autonomously and not just as a subsidiary of U.S. and multinational corporations. It needs to set clear priorities on how to do this, and to finally decide among three options: statehood, a more autonomous version of commonwealth, or independence.

Since by law, Congress ultimately has the last word on the fate of the island, it should pass a plebiscite bill sooner than later. The time for serious discussion about viable alternatives is now. Puerto Rico’s current political system no longer allows for true self-determination, which is the right of every American citizen.

ABOUT THE WRITER

Ed Morales is a writer for Progressive Media Project, a source of liberal commentary on domestic and international issues; it is affiliated with The Progressive magazine. Readers may write to the author at: Progressive Media Project, 409 East Main Street, Madison, Wis. 53703; e-mail: pmproj@progressive.org; Web site: www.progressive.org. For information on PMP’s funding, please visit http://www.progressive.org/pmpabout.html#anchorsupport.

This article was prepared for The Progressive Media Project and is available to MCT subscribers. McClatchy-Tribune did not subsidize the writing of this column; the opinions are those of the writer and do not necessarily represent the views of McClatchy-Tribune or its editors.

(c) 2009, Ed Morales

FBI: No sabotage in Puerto Rico tank explosion

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

By DANICA COTO (AP) – 1 day ago
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — The FBI said Friday there is no evidence of sabotage in last week’s explosion at a Puerto Rico fuel depot, which burned for more than two days and forced the evacuation of hundreds of people. Gasoline vapors from an overflowing fuel tank caused the blast at the Caribbean Petroleum Corp. facility near the U.S. territory’s capital, San Juan, according to Luis Fraticelli, the FBI special agent in charge for the island. He said more than 240 investigators analyzed the explosion and did not find evidence it was intentional. But Fraticelli said authorities are still investigating whether negligence was involved. “Since this is a federal investigation, the word ‘accident’ will not be used,” Fraticelli said at a news conference.

The explosion shortly after midnight on Oct. 23 shattered windows and sent tremors across San Juan. The fire destroyed 21 of the depot’s 40 fuel storage tanks and sent up a plume of thick, toxic smoke. More than 1,500 people were evacuated out of fears of contamination, but there were no deaths. Immediately before the blast, a tanker ship had released nearly 28,000 gallons (106,000 liters) of fuel into the tanks, and an undetermined amount spilled into a drainage ditch that is capable of handling a 10 percent overflow, said ATF spokesman Marcial Orlando Felix.

The fuel released a large amount of vapor, and one of three items could have caused the spark, although Felix declined to name them because officials have not pinpointed the source. Federal and local agents questioned more than 100 people, including company employees, and investigated leads including graffiti found after the blast in a highway tunnel in the capital with the message: “Boom, fire, RIP, Gulf.”

Agents also are investigating what security systems were in place to prevent such an explosion and why apparently no alarms were activated, Felix said. The explosion damaged more than 200 homes, and crews have installed new doors and windows and repaired walls, Gov. Luis Fortuno said. Twelve homes required more extensive repairs, and six will be partially or completely torn down. President Barack Obama had designated Puerto Rico an emergency zone and ordered federal aid to supplement local efforts.

Caribbean Petroleum spokeswoman Frances Rios said the company is cooperating with authorities, and crews have built dikes and contained toxic material to prevent further contamination of water sources.
Caribbean Petroleum supplies 200 Gulf gas stations in Puerto Rico.
Copyright © 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.